21 May 1944 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 22 May 1943

Letter Date – 21 May 1943

Text:

What’s the matter? No letter from you today. I am so used to getting one each day that when I miss one day it seems like a week that I miss. But I hope I get a nice long one tomorrow. I really miss them. All this ink you see on this paper, please excuse it. When I filled my pen it backfired and squirted all over the letter. I didn’t think it was bad enough to throw away so I will use it. You know I have been here about two weeks and it has rained at least half of the time. Again today and so far tonight it has rained hard. This darn weather is really hard on the soldier. At least half of them have colds, some of them so bad that they have went to the hospital. So far I have been lucky. There isn’t much to write about tonight. School is coming along good. Everything is swell except the weather. Sunday is coming up, so I can sleep and write my dearest wife and baby a nice long letter. I have got my clothes pretty well cleaned up so I won’t have to wash anything, and I also have to write Alvin a letter. Also I think it is time to write to your folks. I just found out that one of my pals from my old squadron in St. Pete is right in the same camp, and I have been here two weeks and didn’t know about it. He is supposed to come over and see me Sunday. We had a show here last night at our hall. I didn’t go but I will tell you what happened. You most likely have heard of the man who sang. His name was Lawrence Tibbett. They say he was really good. Maybe your mother has heard of him. I am afraid I will have to close now, as you probably can’t read what I have wrote, so I will close until tomorrow night. Night now, honey, from your soldier husband and daddy.

PS – Write me a extra nice letter telling me how much you love me and how much you miss me. I am so doggone lonesome baby for you. It is all right if you just write me a whole letter telling me how much you love me. Love and kisses, Ralph

Notes: Apparently Lawrence Tibbett was quite the star, though I had never heard of him. He was in the first group of people to have stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and also had a US postage stamp in his honour.

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Pain in the Ass

After being an Amazon Associate for many years I recently received an email saying they would terminate my account for lack of sales. The Althing has not been a cash cow during its years of existence. It has been a labour of love that many would have abandoned years ago. It’s like fishing. Although I haven’t been in years, I enjoy fishing. Sometimes I catch fish, sometimes I don’t. In that time I have discovered that folks who are really good at fishing go to a spot, fish for a short time, and if the fish are not biting they move on…all day long, if necessary. They just keep moving and moving until they find a good spot where the fish are biting. I, on the other hand, am the sort of stubborn asshole that will just sit and sit in one spot. Maybe I will move once or twice, but no more. I’ll try different bait, different gear, cast in different locations from the boat or shore, but by and large I stay put. Don’t know what that says about my personality.

Now, if you are familiar with the Althing you know it has by no means remained static. When health and time permits I update it and try to make it more interesting for folks. I have worked hard on making the code behind the scenes more efficient. Through it all I have enjoyed the process, or most of it. This, however, looks like it’s going to suck big time. Apparently Amazon will not let you do anything to reactivate the account. They do allow you to apply for a new account, but this will mean generating new links for everything you see for sale on Amazon on my site. Perhaps if I knew of a way to do a periodic call to Amazon to pull the links for the items in question and store the links in my database it would be simple, but I know of no such way. I know of no Amazon API that provides such an avenue and I do not have the coding ability to make something from scratch that will do it.

Oh well. Just venting a bit, but I’m going to keep fishing this spot. Time to get to work. Thanks for listening.

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22 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 21 May 1943 [typo or mismatched envelope]

Letter Date – 22 May 1943

Text:

Hi girls,

How are my two babies tonight? I got your letter today and it was the only nice thing I did get today? I was just laying around all day, and when they wanted something done I seem to be the guy that did it. But tomorrow I am going back to school and I would rather do that than lay around. It is getting interesting as I get to know more of it. I am still on duty now and will be until a quarter after eleven. I have been on since five this morning so I have put in a long day, but believe it or not I am not the least bit tired. I bet I will be by the time I go off duty. All next week I am a fire warden and also air raid patrol. This is just in case that a fire breaks out or else they have an air raid alert. In that case we would be the last to leave the post and see that everybody else leaves. Does your folks still fight? I just can see Pappy sitting there in his chair smoking his pipe and being just as stubborn as he can be, and that can be pretty bad at times. I used to get a kick out of him when he was mad, but not your mother. She actually got me scared a few times, but she didn’t seem to bother you in the least. Maybe if I had your guts once in awhile I would get along better. I can still remember how you used to get mad at me, and how you would get way on the other side of the car seat from me and you wouldn’t say a word. Then how we used to go for sometimes ten miles without saying a word. Then how you would come over and put your arms around me and kiss me until I would get some sense in my head, and then we would be happy again. Just to remember those things made me so damn lonesome. Just to live some of those nights once again, I believe I would give at least ten years of my life to do that. I think I better quit talking about those things or else I will get so darn lonesome I will go AWOL. I also got the Argus and a nice letter from Alvin today. He told me you owed him a letter. Now if you haven’t wrote him by the time you get this you sit right down and write to him. Boy, was there a lot of news in the Spring Lake, and I see that my wife and baby girl got in quite a bit of news. You must get around even if it is walking. Boy, is it ever rotten weather around here lately. It rains at least half of the time. There isn’t much news to write about as it is awful quiet. We was supposed to have an air raid tonight but I guess it is just a false alarm. I hope so, as I can use the sleep. I will have to close now, honey, as I have to go to work, so I will sign off until tomorrow night with all my love and kisses to my dearest wife and baby from Pap. [wrote out Morse Code for Pap]

PS – The book is really swell. Thanks a lot.

Notes:

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20 May 1943 – Letter from dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 20 May 1943

Letter Date – 19 May 1943

Text:

Darling Phyllis and Bonny,

Got your daily letter at noon today so am going to answer right back now. There isn’t much to write about but will try and dig up a little news if I can. All I did today was get up to go to school and do a little drilling. Nothing much exciting. Just the same old routine, but I am beginning to like school a little better then I did in the first place. I didn’t tell you I didn’t like it. I didn’t at first, but now it is getting a little more interesting, learning all the different codes and what they mean. It is all pretty much secret so can’t tell you much about it. I can now receive ten words a minute so am getting along real good. I only hope I can keep it up. So old Art married at last. I never thought he would do it. He can’t be much older than 18, and I don’t suppose she is much older, but then we know how kids are, don’t we? If they get along as good as we do they will be alright. Of course Art won’t have to go to the army. He got turned down, as I suppose you know. Or did you tell me? I wish you wouldn’t keep on thinking that I wasn’t going to come back and marry you. It kind of hurts me. That is all past now, but I want to know that I loved you then and I love you now. I would come back from any place and marry you. I want you to know that, and don’t think that I could ever get to even like somebody else. You are the only one for me and always will be. There, does that straighten things up? I know you love me and I love you as much as you love me. Believe me, honey, won’t you please? I don’t even want you to think that I don’t. Say, by the way, why was that piece cut out of the Argus? For the piece from the Neshkoro news? Maybe it was something your mother wanted, huh? I am not going to school tomorrow, as I have a detail job around here. I am going to be barracks orderly. Just keep the barracks clean. I would much rather go to school. Say, sweetheart, I wonder if you would send me something else from there. I would like to have my shoes down here. I mean my Oxfords – the brown ones. It is nice to get out of these heavy shoes and put on something comfortable. Will you do that for me, please? I think I will have to close for tonight, honey. No more time, so night now, baby. More tomorrow. All my love and kisses from Pappy.

Notes: Another mundane letter, with one exception. Based upon my folk’s stories and the date of the marriage, the “Art” referred to here must be Art Schley, who went on to become Sheriff of Waushara County after the war. Schley’s most famous case was the investigation and arrest of notorious nut job Ed Gein, another resident of Waushara County. Schley is pictured below with Gein as he escorts him to the state mental hospital.

For those unfamiliar with Gein, he was the real life inspiration for the movies “Psycho,” “Texas Chainsaw Massacres,” and “Silence of the Lambs.” As I recall, and maybe others can provide more details, my Dad and Art Schley were friends. Dad had said he and a friend worked together at carnivals as labourers and shills, and I’m pretty sure it was Schley.

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19 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 19 May 1943

Letter Date – 18 May 1943

Text:

My dearest wife and baby,

Hi, beautiful. How are you and Bonny tonight? I got the camera and the film. It won’t do me much good now, but I’m going to try and take a few pictures on the sly. I can keep it if I don’t put the film in and keep the camera hid. If I get caught with the film in it will be my neck, but I think I can manage to keep it out of the way. It came here without being busted or even the package broke. The package got an awful beating around the Army. The package I got yesterday was rewrapped at the post office. It was all okay except for the salted peanuts. They were spread around some but I ate every one I could find, along with a little help from the rest of the guys, and I loved it all the more knowing that you had packed it with your little hands. The gum sure came in handy, as we can’t get any from the canteen until the 1st. They even run out of stuff here once in awhile. I had my first ball game tonight. We beat the other team 14 to 13. I don’t suppose you care about that. I remember how you used to like to listen to the ball games on our car radio. Remember that, honey? I may play ball but I will still have time to write to my dearest wife and baby. I will have time to that always. My letters won’t be so long, baby, but I will try and get one wrote every day. I didn’t get a letter direct from you today but I got one that came through St. Pete from Alvin. But I wrote to him from up here so I am waiting for another one from him. Maybe I had better send him another one, as he might not have got the first and I don’t want your big brother to get mad at me. The way I write to you sometimes I don’t wonder that you get mad at me, but you forgive me, don’t you? Here I start with page number two and I don’t know what to write, but I will try and finish at least this side of the page. I haven’t got much time to finish this as I am helping the rest of the guys roll packs. The reason for this is that Thursday night we are having an air raid alert and everybody in camp will have to go out about ten miles from here and stay overnight. It is just a practice one but it will have to be like a real one, so if I don’t write you a letter that night don’t think I forgot you. I will write you one just as twice as long the next night. I think this will be all for tonight as I want to take a bath before I go to bed, so will close with all my love and kisses to my dearest wife and baby from their husband and daddy, Ralph

PS – Give the folks and Bonny my love, and lots of kisses to you right now.

Notes: So Ralph rolls the dice and smuggles a camera and film onto a wartime military base. I can’ recall the man every consciously breaking a law or rule in his life. He was scrupulously honest.

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18 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 18 May 1943

Letter Date – 17 May 1943

Text:

My dearest wife and baby,

Hi, girls. How are you tonight? I am feeling fine and pretty full. I should be full because I ate a lot of that stuff you sent me. Boy, was I ever glad to get it. I knew I was going to get a package but I didn’t figure on that much. I am glad you sent me something like that ’cause then I know you love me a lot. I was not the only one who liked it, because there was a lot of guys around here that seem to like the candy as much as I did. One kid really went for the Cracker Jacks. I called him a big baby for eating them, then I turned around and ate most of them myself. Just to know that they came from you made them taste a lot better. I’m going to keep a lot of the candy for a while because I maybe can use it later. Besides, I want the candy to last for a long time. I also got the money that you sent me. I ain’t going to use it as I won’t have to. I’m going to write yours and Bonny’s name on it and keep it for a keepsake. I also want to thank your folks for the book. That is another thing I like to get, and it looks like a good book. I haven’t had time to read it yet, but I will start it tomorrow night. I got the Argus and a letter from you that was sent through St. Pete. Oh, by the way, when I get done with the book I will send it back to you and you can send me another one, all right? I am getting along good in school. Already I can receive seven words a minute. All you have to do is learn five words a minute in five weeks and I have seven words a minute and in a little over a week, so I guess I am getting along all right. I will have to close now if I want to mail this tonight, so until tomorrow night, Sweetheart, all my love and kisses to my dearest Phyllis and Bonny from Daddy.

PS – Give Bonny a big kiss for me, will you?

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17 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 17 May 1943

Letter Date – 16 May 1943

 

Text:

Good morning sweetheart,

How are you two girls this morning? I only hope that it is a little warmer there than it is here. It is colder than the devil here now, but my bunk is near the stove and we have a nice hot fire in it, and I am writing this letter right beside it. I’m going to try and write you a little longer letter today than I have been lately. I have nothing to do today as far as I know. The letter Clarence sent me he was telling me about the letter that you wrote to him. He said that if you wrote him six pages you must write me at least twenty. I have not wrote to him yet, but when I do I’m going to tell him that he gets longer ones than I do. But he is one hell of a swell guy and I want you to keep writing to him. He was saying that his girl was coming down to see him. I guess her school is out now and she can come down there. I would like to have you come and see me, but I am moved around so damn much that I don’t know where I will be the next week. But instead of you coming to see me I will come home and see you. I only hope it will be quicker than I think it is. I don’t know when I can come home, but I hope it is real soon ’cause I am getting so darn lonesome for you that it is getting so bad that I can hardly sleep. I think that will prove that I love you a lot more than I may sometimes sound like. If I talk or write like that once in awhile it’s just that I love you so doggone much and I miss you so much that I can’t seem to write straight. But when I see you again we can straighten all these matters out. But when I see you I suppose I will get tongue-tied and won’t be able to say nothing, just like I used to be when I was going with you. Remember how I was when that was? Or don’t you? All these brown marks on this letter that you see are made from some candy that a guy give me. I shouldn’t eat it while I am writing but I am hungry, as I didn’t eat any chow this morning. But dinner isn’t so far off, and I think that will consist of chicken and all the trimmings. Doesn’t that sound good? What would sound a lot better would be coming home from a show about midnight to your folks place, then go in the house and have hot biscuits and liver sausage. If we could just live one of those nights once again. Or else stopping at the Moose Inn for some of Ray’s good fish. Every time I talk or think about those things I get all the more lonesome for you. I know you missed those dances but I will learn to dance, or anything you want, after I come home. I want you to be the one to teach me those things. There is no dances within twenty miles of here so you won’t have to worry about me going to any of them. They have shows here every night, but for the service men only. They are only $0.15 and that is where I go when I do go out, but that is few and far between. I am going to go tonight as there is a pretty good show on – “The Human Comedy” with Mickey Rooney. At least they say it is good. Maybe I should tell you a little bit about school right now. I know the whole alphabet in code. Tomorrow I start on the numbers. After all that is done I will start to take messages. If I can receive twelve letters or words in a minute I am supposed to be pretty good. They give us eight weeks to do it in and I think I can do it, as I have been to school only a week and I can receive five words now. I am pretty sure I can do it and with you on my side I am sure of it. I bought something for you down at the Post Exchange. It isn’t much, but it will be something to remember me by. I can’t get my picture taken here right now, but if it is possible I will do it as quick as I can. I also got another piece of jewelry lined up to buy, but they haven’t got actually what I want. I won’t tell you what it is but I think it is pretty nice. You will have to wait until you get it. There isn’t much more that I can think of to write, and I still have to write one to big brother yet today. I wrote to Alvin, but as yet I haven’t heard from him. But it is quite aways  from him to me. I am afraid that I can’t think of any more to write, so we’ll have to close by now, sweetheart. All my love and kisses from Pappy

PS – I love you, I love you, I love you, I love you.

Notes: Just one letter after seeming to take a more adult tone Dad reverts to the old ways, acting kind of whiney that Clarence gets longer letters than he does. Those late night liver sausage sandwiches must have left a big impression on Dad as often as he mentions them. There is a Moose Inn in Wautoma today, but I can’t verify it is the one Dad refers to. I did some searching and was unable to locate more information on it or its owner “Ray.” Maybe one of my Wisconsin cousins can help me out.

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15 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 15 May 1943

Letter Date – 14 May 1943

 

Text:

Dearest wife and baby,

How are my two girls tonight? I hope you feel as good as I do, and I also hope you are as lonesome for me as I am for you. I think you are, aren’t you? The reason I feel so good today is that I got all my back mail from you that was sent down to St Pete. Also one right from home plus one from big brother Clarence. I had so darn much fun reading them that I almost missed school. Boy was I ever glad to get them. While the other guys were not getting any mail I was really pulling them in. You should have seen their faces. I have so darn much to answer that I don’t know where to start, but to begin with I am sort of mad to think you would not believe me when I told you I would come back and marry you if I had joined the Navy. I know how you felt. I don’t suppose you did know if I would have come back, but if you know what had been in my mind you wouldn’t even have to ask me. Honest, honey, I love you more than life itself. It’s awfully hard having you ask me questions like that. I want you to know now sweetheart that you never have to worry about me. I am yours and Bonny’s forever, as long as I live, and I figure on living to a ripe old age. Do you think you can stand me that long? I wanted to marry you before I went to or before I try to go to the Navy, and I would do it all over again if I had a chance. And I don’t think I could love you anymore than I do now. This is the truth you asked for. It’s the whole truth, honey, so help me. I want you to believe me. When I started to read what you asked me I got so damn worried and sick that I couldn’t hardly read any farther, but I want you to ask me anything you want to. It will help clear up a lot of things. But don’t scare me so much next time. About me thinking that you and (?) we’re carrying on – it was just a crazy idea of mine. I was so darn jealous and love you so much that I couldn’t think of anything else. I see what a damn fool I was  now. I guess I am starting to grow up. Not the same little boy that left you, but grown up to think a few straighter thoughts and figure out things in a more sane way. Maybe you won’t get so mad at me then. These letters are not coming so fast as they did from St Pete and this one will be a little shorter one than I write tomorrow night. I’m going to close this one now as the lights are going in a little while. I will write you a big, long one tomorrow night. I will have more time. Until then, goodnight honey. Please don’t worry about me. I will love you always. Night now, baby, from Daddy. PS – Please keep on loving me as I will always love you with all my heart. Ralphie

Notes: I had forgotten that Dad had attempted to join the Navy at some point before joining the Army Air Corps. I don’t recall what kept him out. I don’t think it was anything health related. As for Dad living to a “ripe old age,” I would have to say that didn’t happen. He passed away when he was 70, which to me is not old. His health was good most of his life but he worked exceptionally hard without much rest for 50 years and it finally caught up to him. Smoking did not help. The overall tone of this letter is more deep and contemplative than previous letters. It will be interesting when I get to Mom’s letters to see exactly what she wrote. I can’t quite make out who Dad thought Mom was carrying on with. I know what it looks like, but I don’t want to speculate.

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13 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 13 May 1943

Letter Date – 11 May 1943

 

Text:

My dearest wife and baby,

I’m going to start this letter tonight but I won’t be able to finish it, as it is almost ten and time for the lights to go out,  but I want to write you a few lines each night. I miss you and that little writing I do every night makes me feel a lot better. You know, as the old saying goes, every little bit helps said the old lady as she peed in the sea. Oh, oh. I am sorry. I shouldn’t have said that, but it just came out and I couldn’t help it. Forgive me, honey, will you? Today was my second day of school and it isn’t so easy as it was the first day. When we came in here the guys told us we would go crazy. Down here we call it “dit” crazy. All we do all day is listen to dots and dashes until I almost go nuts. But I think I will make it if I take my time. I went to school tonight for an hour. It sort of helps me out. Boy is the weather ever dirty here now. It has been raining all day and tonight it is foggier than the devil. I think it is going to rain tomorrow, too. Well, sweetheart, I have to close tonight. More tomorrow night, baby. Good morning, darling. How do you feel this morning? I just got up, washed up, made my bunk, and cleaned up. I didn’t go and eat breakfast as I wasn’t hungry and I wanted to drop you a few lines this morning. I would much rather do that than eat. As I said last night about raining, it is still going this morning, harder than ever and it looks like an all-day rain. It don’t make much difference as I am inside all day anyway. Nothing much to write about now, honey, so I will close again. All my love and kisses until tonight. Bye, now. Here I go again, honey, but just for a few lines. It is almost dinner time. I went to school part of the morning, then about 10:30 there was an air raid alert. We had to all run back to our barracks and make a field pack. This means putting a blanket, a tent, and all are mess equipment, plus enough clothes to last for a few days. This all together weighs about sixty pounds. Then after we did that and was ready to go out the call came through for us to unpack all of this and forget about it. Boy, was they ever mad around here. All that work for nothing. It is still raining this noon and it looks like a lot more of it, too, but it has warmed up a lot from what it was. I won’t write anymore now but will finish it up tonight. Until then, bye sweetheart. I love you lots. Hello, babies. Here it is night and I’m going to try and finish it now so I can send it out. All we did was go to school and after that listen to lectures for a couple of hours. Not any hard work, though. My sun tan is getting awfully white looking up here. It’s so cold that we can’t have our coats off at all. But at least it has stopped raining, for a while, anyway. I hope so because it is getting pretty muddy around the grounds. Can’t even keep my shoes shined. I just got back from a nice warm shower so I feel nice and clean. That’s the way I like to feel when I talk to you. I can see now that I treated you rather bad. Not the way I should have, but I will be a lot different about a lot of things when I come home. This is all for now, honey. I have to close with all my love and kisses to my dearest wife and baby. Night, now.

Notes: I was curious about the phrase “dit crazy,” which appears, perhaps, to be a take on “shit crazy.” I found a reference to it in the book “No Forgotten Fronts: From Classrooms to Combat” by Lisa K. Shapiro, which is a collection of World War Two letters. This particular letter was from 1943, written from another radio school by a another solder, so the phrase may have been widespread. I was also curious as to what led to Dad’s epiphany about treating Mom badly, or exactly what he meant by that. By all accounts Dad was kind of an ass when he was younger, some of which can be seen already in these letters.

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11 May 1943 – Letter from Dad to Mom

Letter or Postcard – Letter

Sender – Ralph Peterson

Recipient – Phyllis Peterson

Postmark Place – Red Bank, New Jersey

Postmark Date – 11 May 1943

Letter Date – 10 May 1943

 

Text:

My dearest wife and baby,

Hello sweetheart. How are my two babies tonight? Hope you are both swell. I am feeling good, even after my first day of school. Yes, I actually started school again today. It seems kind of funny after not going to school for so long. I start in the morning at eight and work until 11:30, start again at one and work until 3:30, then from then on until five we have to drill. All we do is learn a code over the telegraph. I would like to tell you what kind I do but it is all restricted, so no secrets must be let out. I think, but I don’t know for sure, that they check through most of the mail. And don’t send my camera here because they aren’t allowed on the post. This is one of the few posts that they won’t let a guy have a camera here. There is a lot of stuff here that they don’t want anybody to know about. I could tell you now but I have to wait until I come home, and after four weeks of school you aren’t allowed to leave the post. I will tell you all about it as soon as I can. There is one thing I can tell you. The main port, which is only six miles from here, was shelled some time ago. Some of the men have wound stripes. They might cross this out, but if they don’t please don’t let anyone else know about it. Let it be just a secret between you and me, right honey? Boy was it ever cold this morning. Must have been close to freezing. The coldest I have seen it since I left Wisconsin, but it seems better now at least. I am at least 400 miles closer to you. It isn’t much, but every little bit helps. There isn’t much to tell you about tonight, but I’m going to try and write you every night. I have a chance to go to night school for a few hours every night and get the jump on some of the guys, and I think I’m going to do it. It will help me out if I want to get a better rating. You would want me to do that, wouldn’t you, sweetheart? I think this is all for tonight, honey, so I will close until next time. Goodnight babies. All my love to the sweetest wife and baby in the world from Pappy

PS – Give my love to the folks and kiss Bonny girl for me.

Notes: Well Ralph doesn’t seem to have a great handle on this whole military secret thing. “I can’t tell you now, but as soon as I get home I’ll spill all the beans.” Okay. And I am dubious about the whole “a port in New Jersey got shelled” thing. A cursory check of online sources does not turn up any ports in New Jersey that came under enemy fire during World War Two. I think either someone was pulling the leg of a green soldier or he misheard the details of some other incident.

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